US Cheer As Total Solar Eclipse Spreads Across Country

SHERIDAN, OREGON/SALMON, IDAHO:  The moon blacked out the sun today as what turn out to be the first coast-to-coast complete solar eclipse in the US in nearly a century start in western Oregon.

Millions of Americans was all looking skyward in wonder with the help of protective glasses, telescopes and cameras.

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After so much buzz, the sight of the moon’s silhouette passing directly in front of the sun, created quite a bit of excitement for people of all ages.

The rare cosmic event is going to be a blockbuster hit, with biggest audiences in human history, consisting of those watching through broadcast and social media.

In terms of figures, around 12 million people live in the 113-km-wide, 4,000-km-long zone where the total eclipse was to appear.

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“I’m really lucky we got to be here today,” said Jason Davis, 29, who got married on Saturday and decided to stop in Oregon for the eclipse. “It’s pretty cool. I’m sort of surprised by the temperature change.”

Nancy Conway, 57, an elementary school principal, said she and her family made the drive from Lynn, Massachusetts.

“Twenty hours, three drivers, four adults, two 6-year-old twins,” Conway said as she sat in a lawn chair facing the harbor. “It’s a once-in-a-lifetime experience.”

“I woke up at 4 a.m. so I’m excited,” said Madeline Rubin, 17, who drove two hours to the stadium with others wearing T-shirts that said “I totally blacked out.”

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The last time this sort of situation arise was from the Pacific to the Atlantic in 1918. The last total eclipse seen anywhere in US occur in 1979.

Daniel Berger, 33, a software developer from New York, said he has been waiting with his wife and their two children for almost an hour.

“This is a far larger crowd than I anticipated,” he said. “It’s the first non-political attraction for D.C. in many years, so that’s nice.”